Black and white dog at home

Home Alone

Many dog owners look forward to National Take Your Dog to Work Day, which was Friday, June 21 this year. It’s great fun to have your buddy sleeping cozily at your feet or to watch him greet new friends with sniffs and tail wags, or play keep-away with a favorite toy.

But where is your four-legged friend the rest of the year? Though some workplaces welcome pets, most do not. It would, of course, be wonderful to be able to stay home with Fido, but someone has to earn the green stuff that we trade for kibble and dog toys, so most of us head off to work each day sadly leaving our dogs home alone.

Not only do we miss them, but bored or lonely dogs have been known to chew furniture, destroy blinds, disturb the neighbors with barking, or even hurt themselves trying to escape. You can help your dog adjust to your absence using the following tips.
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sad dog

Disasters Happen

There’s no telling what tomorrow will bring. For that matter, even one hour into the future is a mystery to us. We do know, though, that June is the beginning of the Atlantic hurricane season; the tornado season is already in full swing; earthquakes, severe weather, fires, floods—it seems there is always some potential disaster “in season.” There’s no getting around it: disasters happen.

But we human beings have the unique capability of imagining the future. Individually and as a species, we analyze our past experiences and use that information to imagine, and even plan for the future. We can, and do, prepare ourselves and our families to survive disasters.

Spring is a good season to review your family’s emergency plan. Remember to include your dog and other pets in your plan, because in a disaster, they face the same dangers as every other member of your family. Advance planning is the key to their safety in an emergency situation.

Here are five tips for emergency planning for your dog.
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Two DogWatch dogs

Enjoy the Great Outdoors!

For those of you who are experiencing the change of seasons from the gray and white of winter to the verdant green of spring, you understand how good the transition feels. It’s a good bet that your pooch feels the same way.

Chances are you’re eyeing the flower bed and your garden patch and trying to remember where you last saw your good gardening gloves. The garden centers have stocked up on fertilizer, bags of mulch and those tempting little the seed packets that carry so much promise.

If your dog enjoys spending time outside, he may be happy to get his paws in there to ‘help’ with your gardening, but that might not work out so well for your garden . . .or for your dog. Your dog’s gardening penchant can be dangerous for him because many beautiful plants, and the fertilizers and mulches that we use to nurture a beautiful landscape, are toxic to dogs.
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